Category Archives: Long Exposure

Hyakuhiro Waterfall In Okutama Japan

Some time ago I came across a photo of the Hyakuhiro Waterfall in Okutama, and ever since I wanted to take a visit. The name Hyakuhiro means “100 hiros,” with a hiro being an old Japanese unit of measurement. While the waterfall isn’t exactly 100 hiros tall, which would be over 4 times its actual…

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Neddick Morning Motion

Several weeks back I posted an image from the Cape Neddick Lighthouse (aka Nubble Light) in York, Maine. The processing behind that image was pretty involved, so with this version using a different composition and a longer exposure, I decided to do my edits in Lightroom only. As you’ve seen in my other Lightroom Only…

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Faux Autumn In The White Mountains

Generally when I’m photographing something I prefer to keep my image at least reasonably close to what I saw in person. For example, I don’t like to mix the sky from one location and time to the mountains of a completely different location and time. I don’t even like to manipulate colors too heavily –…

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Intimate Portrait of the Pemigewasset River

Everyone loves a great wide angle landscape and for good reason – this is how we see the world; it’s how we experience nature around us, wide and open with so much to take in. But there’s another way we experience the world, albeit more subtle, which is more intimate and detailed. We see individual…

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Gleason Falls Stone Bridge

One of my favorite parts of New England is the mixture of American history and nature that collide in the area, and today’s photo is a prime example of that. This photo comes from the Gleason Falls stone bridge, located in Hillsborough, New Hampshire. Originally built in the 1840s, the bridge is still in use…

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